The East Meadow Little League put stringent measures in place to ensure a safe 2021 summer season.

By Angelo Vansant

East Meadow Little League sports complex. // Photo by Angelo Vansant

Editor’s note: This story first appeared in PULSE, which is published by the Lawrence Herbert School of Communication’s Magazine Production class for Hofstra University students and residents of surrounding communities.

Dugouts are filling back up with young athletes. Parents are ready to see their future all-stars return to the diamond ready to go. The light at the end of the proverbial tunnel is near as life is slowly but surely returning to normal.


Pamela Kambanis and her partner Alex co-founded Plantwise to make going plant-based less overwhelming for Long Islanders”

By Robert Traverso

Editor’s note: This story first appeared in PULSE, which is published by the Lawrence Herbert School of Communication’s Magazine Production class for Hofstra University students and residents of surrounding communities.

Pamela Kambanis and her partner Alex co-founded Plantwise to make going plant-based less overwhelming for Long Islanders”

How much water? How much food? How much land?

Questions about the environmental cost of raising animals for food raced through the mind of Pamela Kambanis, co-founder of the Dix Hills-based vegan eatery Plant Wise, while watching a documentary 9 years ago.

“When I watched these documentaries, it was like…


Pamela Kambanis and her partner Alex co-founded Plantwise to make going plant-based less overwhelming for Long Islanders”

By Robert Traverso

Editor’s note: This story first appeared in PULSE, which is published by the Lawrence Herbert School of Communication’s Magazine Production class for Hofstra University students and residents of surrounding communities.

Pamela Kambanis and her partner Alex co-founded Plantwise to make going plant-based less overwhelming for Long Islanders”

How much water? How much food? How much land?

Questions about the environmental cost of raising animals for food raced through the mind of Pamela Kambanis, co-founder of the Dix Hills-based vegan eatery Plant Wise, while watching a documentary 9 years ago.

“When I watched these documentaries, it was like…


By Alan Singer

The New York Times published a number of articles July 10 on the impact of climate change on our lives today. Collectively, they are frightening, though none made the front page.

I’m writing a book on “Teaching Climate History” (Routledge), and each time I see articles such as these I am compelled to update the book as new information emerges.

The July 11 New York Times had even worse news, this time on the front page. The structural stability of Chicago, the second largest city in the United States, is threatened by new erratic water levels, record…


By Nicole Jean Christian

June was National Homeownership Month. For many, homeownership is a part of the American dream that is proving to be increasingly difficult to attain. Long Island home prices have hit historic highs for the second year in a row, reinforcing a 2019 report from New York state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli that found that nearly 40 percent of Long Island homeowners could not afford their homes. Homeownership should not be a luxury few can afford.

Long Island’s skyrocketing home prices and a longstanding history of redlining and housing discrimination make homeownership even more challenging for Black people…


The Stony Brook women’s lacrosse team practicing during Covid times. // Photo courtesy of Stony Brook Athletics.

How two Long Island universities are navigating athletic restrictions during the pandemic.

By Angelo Vansant

Editor’s note: This story first appeared in PULSE, which is published by the Lawrence Herbert School of Communication’s Magazine Production class for Hofstra University students and residents of surrounding communities.

Squat racks spread six feet apart. Exercise equipment piled up on the folded bleachers. A socially distant exercise circuit that flows safely for the athletes. Hofstra University’s athletic department has made a makeshift workout area on the second floor of the David S. Mack Arena to ensure social distancing.

Nathan Drickamer, a senior men’s lacrosse…


By Leah Chiappino

Editor’s note: This story first appeared in PULSE, which is published by the Lawrence Herbert School of Communication’s Magazine Production class for Hofstra University students and residents of surrounding communities.

Courtesy Gabriella Claire Marino/ Unsplash

At the height of the pandemic, it was funeral workers who most intimately bore witness to the nearly 6,500 Long Islanders who lost their lives to the coronavirus.

Melissa Schmidt, a funeral director at Oyster Bay Funeral Home, had families waiting for three weeks after their loved ones had died to hold funerals due to the capacity limits that cemeteries had to put in place. She was…


By Elaine Gross

Four milestones were reached in June on the road to racial equity. They recognize progress while underscoring the distance yet to be traveled. They came at the federal, state and county levels, and all have significant implications for Long Island.

One was the designation of Juneteenth, June 19, as a national holiday. As the White House Proclamation states, “On Juneteenth, we recommit ourselves to the work of equity, equality and justice.” ERASE Racism is dedicated to that work, and the nation still has a great deal to accomplish.

In another milestone, the Biden administration acted decisively to…


By Melissa Berman

Hit the lights, cue the band and start warming up, because Broadway is back! The curtains were closed and the stages were dark for over a year, but Broadway is hosting a revival like never before. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced in early May the lifting of the state’s capacity restrictions in public places, including Broadway.

Member of the Grand Avenue Middle School theater company performing recently, masked to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

Even though Broadway is finally reopening, however, that does not heal the financial wounds that it suffered when the coronvarirus pandemic hit, shutting down theaters across the state. …


By Leah Chiappino

Editor’s note: This story first appeared in PULSE, which is published by the Lawrence Herbert School of Communication’s Magazine Production class for Hofstra University students and residents of surrounding communities.

Covid-19 first hit Long Island on March 5, 2020, and as of press time, had infected more than 310,000 Long Islanders, nearly six thousand of whom lost their lives. They were our friends, mothers, fathers, co-workers and neighbors. They were philanthropists, union members and church-goers. They were all of us. These are a few of their stories.

A LOVING FATHER AND
PROUD IMMIGRANT

Pedro Braulio Vega Farromeque came to New York from Lima…

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